The Evaluation of Cross Infection of Sorghum Genotypes by Ustilago cynadontis (Henn. & Henn.), the Causal Agent of Smut in Couch grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] in South Sudan

A note

  • Philip Wani Marchelo-d’ Ragga
  • Susan Moses
Keywords: Cross infection, Sorghum genotypes, artificial inoculation, Ustilago cynadontis, Teliospores

Abstract

Cross infection trials of Sorghum by smut of couch grass incited by (Ustilago cynadontis Henn. & Henn.) were conducted in 20L pots at University of Juba during 2017/2018 cropping season; located at latitude 4050, 529’N and longitude 31035, 417’E and at an altitude of approximately 400m above sea level. Six local sorghum genotypes were planted in pots replicated four times and arranged in a randomized complete block design; prior to planting each pot was artificially inoculated with teliospores from fifteen air dried Ustilago cynadontis sori. Results showed no cross infection in all six sorghum genotypes tested. The study recommends similar studies to be re-conducted to include a larger number of local sorghum genotypes since couch grass, Cynodon dactylon is a known alternate host of Sporisorium sorghi which is an established causal agent of covered kernel smut of sorghum.

Author Biographies

Philip Wani Marchelo-d’ Ragga

Department of Agricultural Sciences, School of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, (SNRES)University of Juba, P.O. Box 82 Juba, South Sudan

Susan Moses

Department of Agricultural Sciences, School of Natural Resources and Environmental Studies, (SNRES) University of Juba, P.O. Box 82 Juba, South Sudan

References

[1] I. Arnon I. “Crop production in dry regions”, Volume II. Leonard Hill, London, UK: pp. 683, 1972.
[10] R.G. Shivas, K. Vanky, “The smut fungi of Cynodon dactylon, including Sporisorium normanensis”, a new species from Australia. Fungal diversity, vol. 8:149-154, 2001.
[11] J.K.S. Dung, L.M. Carris, B.P. Hamm, “First report of Ustilago cynadontis Henn & Henn., causing smut of Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. in Washington State, United States”. Plant Disease, vol. 98(2): 280, 2004.
[12] K.A. Gomez, and A.A. Gomez, “Statistical Procedures for Agricultural Research”. 2nd Edition, John Willey and Sons, New York, USA: pp. 690, 1984.
[13] P.S. Marley, “Cynodon dactylon: an alternate host for Sporisorium sorghi, the causal organism of Sorghum covered smut”. Crop protection, vol. 14 (60): 491-493, 1995.
[2] FAO. “Production Yearbook”, Food and Agriculture of the United Nations, (FAO), Vol. 59, Rome, 2005.
[3] CGIAR (1997). “CGIAR Priorities and Strategies for resource Allocation during 1998-2000”, www.cgiar.org, 1997, (08 June 2004).
[4] G.N. Agrios, “Plant pathology”, 4th Edition. Academic Press Inc. London, UK: pp. 635, 1997.
[5] A.R. Frederiksen, “Compendium of sorghum diseases”, The American Phytopathological society. USA, pp. 82, 1986.
[6] E.J. Kenyi, A.G.T. Babikri, S.M. Omer, P.W. Marchelo-d’Ragga, “Evaluation of Sorghum Genotypes for tolerance to Strigahemontheca (Del.) Benth. (Lamiales:Orobanchaceae) and Yield in the rain-fed Areas of Damazin, Sudan”. International Journal of Life Sciences and Scientific Research,vol. 3(3): 1003-1006, 2017.
[7] G.M. Kaula, M. Chisi, “The importance and distribution of sorghum and millet diseases in Zambia”. Abstracts of Posters. Ministry of Agriculture, Zambia. INTSORMIL, International Principle Investigators Conference. November 18-20, 2002. Addis Ababa. Ethiopia, 2002.
[8] X. Irz, C. Thirtle, S. Wiggins, “Agricultural growth and poverty Alleviation”. Development Policy Review, vol. 19: 449-466, 2001.
[9] P.W. Marchelo-d’Ragga, B.C. Misaka, “A First report of [Ustilago cynadontis (Henn.) Henn: Ustilaginales] the causal agent of smut of couch grass Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers. in South Sudan”. International Journal of Agricultural Research and Review, vol. 3(7): 356-358, 2015.
Published
2020-09-02
How to Cite
Ragga, P. W. M.- d’, & Moses, S. (2020). The Evaluation of Cross Infection of Sorghum Genotypes by Ustilago cynadontis (Henn. & Henn.), the Causal Agent of Smut in Couch grass [Cynodon dactylon (L.) Pers.] in South Sudan. GPH - International Journal of Agriculture and Research, 3(08), 01- 04. Retrieved from http://gphjournal.org/index.php/ar/article/view/296